Great Walks for Tourists in Antigua

Are you a visitor to Antigua who would love to explore the nature of Antigua or connect on a deeper level? Then you may be interested in some of the great walks and trails in the country that will give you a different view of the island outside of the regular “sun sea and sand”. Here are a list of five great walks for tourists in Antigua.

Christian Valley Trails

Christian Valley Trails – The Christian Valley Nature Trail is located on the south west portion of the island and is great for those looking for easy to moderate walks. The trail starts out from Christian Valley, an agricultural station located in part of the “green belt” in Antigua between the Sherkley Mountain Range at the end of the Jennings village. The available walks are split up into three main sections: The Central Valley, the Northern Loop, and the Southern Loop. The Central Valley is the easiest walk, with relatively flat terrain through the middle of the valley, and is about half a mile in length. The Northern Loop is an easy to moderate walk, passing through grassy meadows and some limited slopes with level footing. The most difficult trail, the Southern Loop, is about a mile in length with views of the Valley and some of the mountains. Along the trail are a number of rare and endemic bird species, making it a great walk for those in love with bird watching.

Falmouth to Rendevous Bay

Rendezvous Bay

Rendezvous Bay

Falmouth to Rendevous Bay – This walk will take you to the beautiful Rendevouz Bay, one of the quietest yet most attractive beaches on the island. This walk starts from the village of Falmouth. As you reach the end of the village, just before starting to climb up Horseford Hill, turn onto Fareel Avenue and drive until you reach the split in the road with the sign for Spring Hill Riding Stables. After parking, take the road on the left which leads to Turtle Bay. While this is an easy to moderate wawlk, you should watch for tree roots along the track as well as Acacia or “cassie” trees that have thorns that can pierce your shoes. You can make the beach stop at Rendevous or you can continue walking along the trail which will lead you back to the beginning.

Lookout Trail

Lookout Trail – This trail starts from the top of Shirley Heights lookout, and there should be a sign marking the entrance. This is a relatively easy and straightforward walk, although there are a large rocks that will need to be climbed over. The trail ends at Freeman’s Bay, close to the Galleon Bay Resort.

Jones Valley Trail

The Trail.

The Trail.

Jones Valley Trail – This trail starts from the tradesman’s entrance at The Inn Hotel at English Harbour. The trail leads through the forest, which has plenty of shade and is great if you need a cool walk. There are a few boulders in a dry creek bed to scramble over. After reaching a dam, take the right at the end and continue along the trail through the forest. The trail will be marked with white paint on rocks or trees. At the end of the walk you will pass an old cemetery and a brick sluice and sediment trap which was once part of the old navy barracks during the colonial era.

Wallings Dam Trail

Wallings Dam Trail – The Wallings Dam is a small dam that was built in 1900. The area was planted with a number of trees to aid in creating a water shed area, providing shade and a beautiful base for a walk in part of the most lushly forested area in Antigua. For those looking for an easy walk, they can park at the small water treatment plant, and walk the trail to the dam. There are a number of large trees and plants, as well as rare and endemic plants. Along the path you will see some huge steps, which are actually drains built to slow the flow of water into the dam. On reaching the dam is a small picnic area complete with swing and barbeque pit.
What’s your favourite walk or trail in Antigua? Do you have any other trails you think that would make great walks for tourists in Antigua?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply (appreciated thank you)

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s